Salsa dancing research paper

The movements and steps that make up the choreography of the Salsa, which is a Latin ballroom dance, are made distinct by dancing in accordance with the progression of beats in the music. Weight changes (steps) are made throughout that define the dance, with three weight changes taking place in every four beat measure. The Rhumba, another Latin ballroom dance, is composed of basic syllabus figures. These figures are easily recognized by onlookers and allow them to judge the technical performance of the dancers. Foot movement in the Cha Cha, still another Latin ballroom dance, is led by a male dancer, who takes his female companion through forward basic movements and backward basic movements to a 4/4 beat.

I've also shown the men's steps for three different styles of salsa: "LA", "New York" and "Palladium". The notation I have used is pairs of letters: first "L" or "R" for left or right foot, then "F", "S" or "B" for forward, on the spot or backward. I have also put a slash ("/") for when the break is, when you change direction. For LA and Palladium start with your right foot in front of your left, but for New York style start with your left foot in front. There's no way you can learn to dance salsa from reading about it, but the steps are there to let you see how the steps and the percussion instruments interact.

The timing of the dance is “quick, quick, slow”—-exactly the same as salsa. The “slow” beat is twice as long as the “quicks.” Hence there are 4 beats to a measure and the dancer steps on 3 of them. Note that salsa dancers can step on beats 1, 2 and 3 or on beats 2, 3, and 4.
The former pattern is called “dancing on 1” and the latter is called “dancing on 2,” assuming that the first step is the rock step. Most Cubans dance on two, and some American dancers prefer the more relaxed feeling that dancing on two creates. However, some dancers prefer to dance on one since that is more consistent with an American approach to music, and the first beat is easier to find. Dancing on two is a little more musically difficult. Rueda in this country is generally danced on one. To the reader, this difference–which beat the dance pattern starts on—may seem like a small matter. But to serious “on 1” or “on 2” dancers, it is the stuff of endless discussion and debate!

Vicki Regan teaches dancing the way she learned, step by step, one move at a time. Everything is carefully explained and demonstrated for both men and women. You'll start with the basics, then work your way up to combinations and moves that are easy to learn, but very impressive on the dance floor. Vicki Regan has danced on Broadway and in the movies and was a National and North American Ballroom and Latin Dance Champion. She has taught many people including other dance teachers and Ballroom competitors. Ron De Vito, Vicki's teaching partner, is also an acclaimed Broadway dancer and a former National Ballroom Champion.

Salsa dancing research paper

salsa dancing research paper

Vicki Regan teaches dancing the way she learned, step by step, one move at a time. Everything is carefully explained and demonstrated for both men and women. You'll start with the basics, then work your way up to combinations and moves that are easy to learn, but very impressive on the dance floor. Vicki Regan has danced on Broadway and in the movies and was a National and North American Ballroom and Latin Dance Champion. She has taught many people including other dance teachers and Ballroom competitors. Ron De Vito, Vicki's teaching partner, is also an acclaimed Broadway dancer and a former National Ballroom Champion.

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