Henry david thoreau on the duty of civil disobedience essay

Thoreau wonders whether these special moments are “simply a transient realization of what might be the whole tenor of our lives” — in other words, whether this state could somehow become permanent. Maharishi explains that when we experience Transcendental Consciousness, the fourth state, on a regular basis, it begins to coexist alongside waking, dreaming, and sleeping. We become permanently anchored in our inner, unbounded, silent Self, ever awake in our innermost nature. This, Maharishi explains, is a fifth state of consciousness, which he terms Cosmic Consciousness.

Having never married, Henry Thoreau could choose not "to keep pace with his companions," and, indeed, he heeded "a different drummer." He kept his needs simple. Other than a rowboat and his books, he owned almost nothing. He boarded mostly with his family, and on several occasions, with the Emersons. When he ran out of money, he took a paid job until he was flush again. He could always find work as a surveyor, and he was a skilled carpenter. "He chose to be rich," wrote his friend Emerson , "by making his wants few and supplying them himself."

Henry david thoreau on the duty of civil disobedience essay

henry david thoreau on the duty of civil disobedience essay

Media:

henry david thoreau on the duty of civil disobedience essayhenry david thoreau on the duty of civil disobedience essayhenry david thoreau on the duty of civil disobedience essayhenry david thoreau on the duty of civil disobedience essay